All posts in 60 seconds with a Harrier

Monday Memories with Caroline Tuite

Padraig Keane : Clonliffe Harriers 1970-2016. On a Sunday morning in October 1967, after coming back from mass in his native Ballinlough, Co. Roscommon, a certain Frank Greally came knocking to see if Padraig could run for Ballyhaunis A.C. in the Mayo Youths Cross Country Championships as they were “a man down”. Padraig cycled 6 miles to Ballyhaunis, was picked up there, brought to Hollymount and ran his first crosscountry race. He didn’t know much about cross-country at that stage, but finished 2nd, the team won Gold and he came home with two medals- all I might add in a pair of Brown Suede Shoes!!, (No vaporflies around then). He always said “Elvis had blue, but I had brown.” He loved Cross-Country and started training, running 6 miles as hard and as fast as he could and if he met a car, he would jump over the wall because if they saw him they would think he was mad!! (Not too many cars around then).

A few years later B.L.E. organised an athletics seminar in Galway and Padraig was invited. He found himself with elite athletes and learned that “Racing is racing, and training is training” when he was told to slow down on a training run. He ran for Ballyhaunis A.C. and Moore A.C.when he worked in that area. He won loads of medals and trophys and then the prizes started to come in. Everything was displayed in the “parlor” at home. A new cabinet had to be got, to show them all off to the neighbours. I remember he won a “Gold” coffee set. It was my pride and joy, but of course never used!!.(I don’t think the bottle of Irel coffee would have been appropriate for it!!)

In 1970 Padraig went to Manchester to work and joined Sale Harriers. He was a member of the Sale team that won a 100 mile relay. Each member of the team ran one mile (no athlete could run more than one leg) and they averaged 4:57.. If he wasn’t racing he could be found in Old Trafford supporting his beloved United -but we wont hold that against him!!

He returned to Dublin with the intention of joining Frank Greally at Donore Harriers ,but he didn’t know where they were located. Frank was to ring him to tell him where to go but as he said himself “I’m still waiting for the call”!!. A work colleague told him he knew a man who ran and would be put in touch with him.

Padraig was picked up the following Sunday morning by none other than Laro Byrne, who was on his way to a race in Santry and asked him to come along. He told Padraig if he didn’t like the club he would personally bring him to Donore. Padraig ran a four mile cross-country race in Santry woods surrounded by legends and Olympian: Frank Murphy, Danny McDaid, Des McCormack, Paddy Marley, George McIntyre to name just a few. They were all Irish Internationals but Padraig finished 3rd in this great field. As a result of the warm welcome he received he decided there and then to join Clonliffe Harriers.

Under Laro’s direction Padraig made great progress. In Feb 1971 I remember travelling from Ballinlough to Tullamore to watch him run in the National Junior cross-country-which he won. I was so proud of him and as he went through the finish line, I broke free from my parents and followed him through the finishing chute. He held my hand as we walked through, something to this day I’ll never forget. Eamonn Coughlan was 2nd. .Padraig represented Ireland in the International cross-country championships in San Sebastian that year winning his first Irish vest. The following season he finished 6th in the Senior cross-country running a stormer of a race making the Irish team for the world cross-country in Cambridge, and he still a Junior.

Donore continued to dominate Irish distant running for the next three years but 1975-76 season, the Clonliffe team of Padraig, Jerry Kiernan, young Frank Murphy and Gerry Finnegan toppled the 8 in a a row Donore team to take the National title for the first time. Clonliffe Captain Christy Brady put his trust in that young team, who all had great respect for him. Padraig always sang his praises of Christy. He had great knowledge of the sport and a shrewd psychologist-long before sports psycologists or ”witch doctors”as Padraig often called them! Padraig remembered been a “bold boy” on the night before an important road relay, having had a “few to many” (not like Padraig!). Feeling terrible up to a hour before he was to run,when he started to warm up, he said “he was going to have a good one”.- he smashed the course record and opened up a 90 second gap on the second runner. He was rewarded by the “biggest bear hug I ever got in my life” from a delighted Christy.

National Road Relays, Padraig takes over from Frank Murphy

Padraig continued to be a stalwart for Clonliffe and amassing an amazing total of 15 Dublin Senior Team Gold medals over a 20 year period. In 1976 he joined the Army and was stationed in the Curragh in the medical core. The army had an elite athletic squad at the time and he loved this. He trained with great athletes there, Brendan Downey, Paddy Murphy, Brian Keeney, and Paul Delaney. The highlight for Padraig was when he represented Ireland in the World Military Games in Finland, and ran a 2:22 marathon to take silver. He now had a world championship medal to add to his collection. He became disillusioned with the army shortly after and left them having served as he said himself “3 years and NO days”. Padraig and Brian Keeney were also picked (by invitation) to run the marathon course in Seoul ,Korea before the Olympics there. I cant recall how they got on, but I do know a good time was had!!.

National Vets XC, Kinenaule

Padraig continued to run as a vet (or master) and won the title in 1994. He had now won national medals at junior, intermediate, senior and master levels. He was also club Captain in 1990/91. Many years ago Padraig got a motion passed at the club A.G.M. proposing that cross-country running be restored as an Olympic sport. Its great to see IAAF recently recommended to the IOC that cross-country should indeed be reinstated as an Olympic sport. There would be some discussion at the Clonliffe bar about this now!! He was also the brain behind the first Port Tunnel races,-and what a success that was.

Padraig liked nothing better than to hold court in the bar on a Sunday afternoon- or indeed anytime and engage in any topic under the sun, keeping the vocal cords well lubricated with a creamy pint. On meeting you he would greet you with: “May the hinges of your friendship never rust”. If he had a point to prove it would be “My learned friend”. He loved to travel to many Athletic meetings abroad ,but he had a great fear of flying- hence the invention of “aviation fuel” !!. He met many great characters on his travels.

Padraig away with “Aviation Fuel” and Sean Callan!

List Of Achievements(to the best of my knowledge);2nd Mayo Youths C.C / 4 Roscommon one-mils c’ships/12 Connaught C.C Golds/15 Dublin C.C Golds/19 Leinster Snr. C.C/ 6 All-Army C.C/1 World Military Silver in Marathon/1 World Military C.C./ Five international vests. Some record.

Padraig Keane: athlete, carpenter, inventor, philosopher, wit and gentleman has enriched the lives of many people lucky enough to know him. Padraig sadly passed away in January 2016

Another 60 Seconds, no. 8 Sean Doran

Today brings Season 2 of 60 Seconds to a close as we feature an athlete who is almost part of the furniture. A 20 year veteran, despite his tender years and an athlete who maybe set to replace Gary O’Hanlon as the club’s most prolific racer: Sean Doran.

Bio: 5000-10000m runner mainly. Work in a wholesale factory as a fork lift driver but thats just my hobby, chasing the Olympic dream is my real job

What age did you take up the sport of athletics and why? Very young about 7 i was always involved with running as my da is a runner and he used to bring(drag) me and my friends out and make us train.

When and why did you join Clonliffe Harriers? Officially joined clonliffe in 2000 i think. so ye 2 decades of failure so far😂. Truth be told i only start even attempting proper running training when i was 20 and have been upping it ever so slightly since. I have been improving very slowly for the last few years and alot more to come. I was in the taekwondo club that used to train in the stadium hall 1st for a couple of years before Clonliffe with my friends but was only a matter of time before my da made us go out onto the track. Then security(Gladys) made us get off the track. I was more talented at taekwondo but i was destined to be a runner i suppose. So my da made me officially join one night and over 20 years later i am still here

What is your favourite training workout? 6 x 1k off 3min recovery is usually the go to one to show you if you are race ready. although i very rarely get it right and have yet to really get it right tbh.

And your least favourite? Eh prob 25 x 600m hills in the phoenix park(yes that is a thing) or maybe one of Philip O’Doherty’s track sessions of 25 straight laps with 800 5k pace/800 marathon pace.

What’s your favourite race / athletics meet? Whats the next bhaa race? Ah i suppose the Raheny 5 for its atmosphere is unmatched in amateur road races and the strength in depth of the field.

What is your most cherished or proudest moment in athletics? (as athlete and/or coach) Probably my most recent win in the Lusk 4 mile. Not just because I Won but how I felt. Even before the race started I knew I was feeling good and I would either run great or throw it away mentally. At this race I felt i was on the verge of been where I always wanted to be in running.

What was your worst injury – and how did you get over it? I never really get injured and if i do i usually run through it thanks to bad coaching(but i am not gonna get into that today).i can get a really bad neck injury every now and then which i think might be something resurfacing from landing bad on a trampoline as a kid on holidays. At christmas i felt paralysed from the neck down but as soon as i felt it ease a bit i was painkillered up and on the Tom Brennan 5k start line new years day. Atm 2 months in to corona season i start having knee problems and missed a few weeks and am now trying to come back but have been hit with lower leg/top of foot pain on the opposite leg so its not looking good right now sadly. I never get injured racing every week so it must keep me strong as soon as i stop racing im injured. Most people would think the opposite😂

(For a coach or seasoned athlete) What piece of advice would you give an aspiring athlete? No matter how many bad races you have don’t give up. Keep consistently training away whether good or bad results because every day is a different result in running particularly at amateur level. No matter how long you are waiting your day might come when everything just clicks for you. You are remembered for your good races not your bad races.

Do you have any memorable or funny story from Clonliffe Harriers that you could share? (the censorship board may review!) I am sure 90% of my races are a good laugh for onlookers not for me though particularly national xc championship ones

What’s your favourite meal? For competition-i would usually have bagels with coffee and maybe a cereal bar like a rice crispy square and a banana. Outside competition- burger and chips with lots of garlic sauce.

Who is your sporting ‘hero’? (athletics or other) Irish-Peter Somba or Conor McGregor International-Stone Cold Steve Austin oh you mean a “real”sport…Galen Rupp

What’s your favourite…? Film -Happy Gilmore Song or Album.snoop dogg-gin n juice. Radiohead-the bends.

What’s your favourite holiday destination? Florida i should of been there damn this corona.

What’s your favourite hobby or activity outside of athletics Doing as little as little as possible listening to music and watching movies stuffing my face.

If you were Seb Coe what changes would you implement to improve our sport? Stop this showing field events in the middle of long distance races. I mean i know its good for the flow but its not necessary watching them stand around doing nothing for ages in between. then showing replays of the jump. putting there tights back on. all the while we are missing critical moves in the race! Maybe its just me but i could watch a whole marathon without blinking😂

How would your non-athlete friends describe you? (in 3 words) Friends? You know i am a runner right. Ah no prob “he doesn’t talk”.

What is your next running goal ? If i can get over the injuries stopping me at the minute and get back where i was before i think i should be able go sub 15 and sub 31 cause i know thats where i was 2 months ago.

How are you motivating yourself to continue training at these difficult times? I would have stopped straight away when races stopped normally as i am just that lazy but couldnt cause i was literally just hitting my best form ever. What kept me going through first 2 months of corona was my last race wins and knowing how good i felt at them. I was afraid let that edge go cause it took me 20 years to get😂. But the injuries then took over anyway so maybe the less motivation i have to run at the minute the better. It is the best time ever to be injured really if it just hadn’t of been for that form i was in i would be loving it.

Another 60 seconds, no. 7 Aoife Hession

Another of the club’s fine juniors, an athlete who already will shortly be celebrating her 10th anniversary of being a Clonliffe Harrier, some may say it seems longer!

Bio: I’m Aoife Hession ,17 and currently in 5th year in Dominican college. I am mainly a middledistance athlete primarly 1500m or 3000m.

What age did you take up the sport of athletics and why? I think I was about 8 years old when I first set my eyes on the fabulous Gladys Cooper. I was never any good at team sports ask any of my friends. I somehow manage to either get hit in the face with a ball or it magically slipped out of my hands .I’m sure I was the reason for a lot of defeats in either rounders or bench ball in school due to my inability to catch a ball and KEEP it in my hands. My brother and sister were also apart of Clonliffe so I just came up one night and the rest is history.

What is your favourite training workout? I think I like the most hated workout which is 1km reps. I really enjoy the distance and like how its not very speedy because I very much dislike that sort of thing.

And your least favourite? This is a tough one because there are a lot! But would have to say 800m reps, everything about them is a no from me.

What’s your favourite race / athletics meet? I really enjoy any of the school’s cross-country races. Although we could all be on different teams we still always support and encourage our fellow Clonliffe teammates. I will never forget running in a schools xc race in Santry and hearing Evan Foster encouraging me all the way up the hill. I was zoning out by the walled garden but he put me back in the race and reminded me of the main objective. Not going to lie it really scared me at the time though.

What is your most cherished or proudest moment in athletics? (as athlete and/or coach) I think my proudest moment would have to be when I won a silver medal in the 3000m in 2018.What made it even better was the fact I didn’t even know I had gotten one due to two age groups being mixed together.

What was your worst injury – and how did you get over it? I have actually been very lucky with injuries I have never really gotten anything serious. It must be my handy Asics! I think it was around this time last year I just had a slight injury in my hip but after doing stretches given by the physio I was back in action. I’m sure Noel was heartbroken when I was missing for 2 weeks.

(For a coach or seasoned athlete) What piece of advice would you give an aspiring athlete? Noel is going to tell me to take my own advice on this one but you should always have confidence in your abilities to perform well. If you have the mindset I can’t do an extra 400m rep when the coach asks then you wont do it therefore you’re not pushing yourself.As hard as it can be to say yes Noel I’ll do that extra 400m even though you know it will be hard. After you feel like you have achieved something higher than yourself. That way you know for next time I’m well able to keep going and with that confidence you can exceed your expectations. I would like to think I have this mindset but that is in fact not the case

Do you have any memorable or funny story from Clonliffe Harriers that you could share? (the censorship board may review!) In Seville when we were sitting in one of the rooms, I told story to everyone trying to convince them that my kettle at home was haunted and wanted tea. I said that whenever I said “do you want tea” to the kettle it would turn on. They all just laughed and thought is this girl okay? I did drive Alana Fitzimons insane when we got back to the room later that night and I hid the kettle in the wardrobe because I thought it looked scary.

What’s your favourite meal? A. For competition I usually have the typical chicken and pasta B. Outside competition I love Chinese food, so I make a banging fried rice doused in soy sauce

Who is your sporting ‘hero’? (athletics or other) A. Irish My sporting heroes would be no one but my teammates (Sarah, Alana and Abbie) they help make long runs bearable. Their incredible vocal cords that can be heard throughout the phoenix park on an 85 minute run is what makes them an inspiration to me. B. International Dina Asher Smith although I am not a sprinter she is always smiling when she comes out onto the track and even if she has a bad race which is very rare, she takes the positives out of the experience.

What’s your favourite…? A. Film I genuinely have no idea but I do like horror movies but that night going to bed is terrifying. B. Song or Album This is cruel I can’t pick but I am a big fan of the Arctic monkeys and the odd bit of girls aloud because I think they are superior to the spice girls C. Book I wouldn’t be much of a reader and there has never really been a book that has stood out to me, but the Mr men books are forever ingrained into my memory. You may be wondering why Mr Men but think about they’re easy to read, easy storyline and of course a range of characters to choose from. What’s not to love!!

What’s your favourite holiday destination? Tavira, Portugal. The man selling doughnuts on the beach is what makes this place stand out to me.

What’s your favourite hobby / activity outside athletics? I honestly don’t know, like many of us running is a major part of our lives but I enjoy going on cycles with my friends and chatting about anything and everything.

If you were Seb Coe what changes would you implement to improve our sport? I would enforce stricter rules around doping in the sport because I feel too many athletes get caught on a number of occasions but are still respected so highly in the sport.

How would your non-athlete friends describe you? (in 3 words) Funniest person alive

What is your next running / athletics goal? (whenever normality returns!) I would like to improve my 5k time along with getting a pb in the 1500

How are you motivating yourself to continue training at these difficult times? By keeping in contact with friends helped because you were able to discuss the training and encourage each other to go out and do what needed to be done whether it was a 50-minute run or just core and stretching.

Aoife in Seville

Another 60 Seconds, no. 6 Mick Kearney

Another Clonliffe lifer. Athlete, committee member, Treasuer, administrator, Race Director, pint puller, pint drinker, you name it Mick Kearney has been there, done it and lost the T Shirt!

Bio: Member of Clonliffe Harriers for the past 35 years. While I did some training and had modest success was too easily lead astray into more dedicated socialising. Nonetheless was delighted to be associated with the top Athletics Club in Ireland and assisted the club in a number of roles including Treasurer.

What age did you take up the sport of athletics and why? I was always fascinated by track and field and made a point of watching top class international athletics on TV. I later started attending Olympics, World and European Championships and had some memorable trips in the company of Sean Callan and Harry Gorman. The main reason I ran initially was to steer clear of trouble as a kid. I found that I had a kick and sprint ability that enabled me to evade those in hot pursuit. I had a brother in law, Henry Kiely, who was a keen runner and I joined him occasionally. It was not until I came to Dublin in 1980, working in the Revenue Commissioners in Dublin Castle, that I started running consistently. I found a ready companion in the great Jimmy Bennett. Lunch times consisted of runs from the Castle to the Phoenix Park. As Jim used train for the Dublin Marathon I also took this route and entered on a number of occasions. My interest in running did not go unnoticed and I was recruited to run for Revenue’s Customer and Excise Team in the Business Houses. The team included Pat Healy, Seamus Creed, Christy Kearns and the late Tadgh O’Keeffe.

When and why did you join Clonliffe Harriers? I joined Clonliffe in 1985. The reason for joining was that practically all of Revenue’s Customs and Excise Team were members of Clonliffe Harriers. As I was starting to show some promise my colleagues persuaded me to join Clonliffe and take my running to another level.

What is your favourite training workout? Fartlek, was always my favourite work out. I found it was highly effective in improving my running speed and endurance. It suited me to alternate between fast segments and slow jogs. I particularly enjoyed the sessions overseen by Maurice Ahern in Malahide. Laro Byrne, Paddy Marley, Tommy Griffin and the late Padraig Keane were great motivators.

And your least favourite? Mile repeats was the most difficult.

What’s your favourite race / athletics meet? 800m and the Morton Games. It has been great to see the Morton Games growing in stature under the direction of Noel Guidan.

What is your most cherished or proudest moment in athletics? (as athlete and/or coach) The event that gave me the greatest satisfaction was breaking 3 hours in the Marathon for the first time. What benefitted me enormously was the introduction to serious and focused training in Clonliffe. Within a year of joining I went under 3 hours in the Detroit Free Press Marathon on 17th October 1986, knocking 35 minutes off my previous best time in the process. Another international success was in New York in 1996 on route back from the Olympics in Atlanta. Both Pat Bonass and I entered the New York Road Runners race – the Kurt Steiner Speed Series which was held on Staten Island. We both won our respective Master categories which was a great thrill. I was delighted to have the privilege, with Johnny O Leary, of accompanying the Clonliffe cross country teams, coaches and officials on their visit to Seville earlier this year. It was a fantastic occasion to see so many Clonliffe athletes competing to such a high standard in one of the top cross country races in Europe. A great tribute to Caption Joe Cooper and Co. Long may such trips continue. Most of my memorable moments are now ensuring events are run successfully. The Clonliffe 2 Mile is a highlight of each year together with the continuing sponsorship of the event by the Kavanagh Family in Glasnevin. I am also delighted to be able to support the Grand Prix . On the national stage I work in the AAI Call Room.

What was your worst injury – and how did you get over it? Thankfully I have not incurred any major injury. One that I recall is turning on my ankle during Mick Murphy 5 mile in Malahide back in the late 1980s. Amazingly I was able to continue running to the finish line and win the handicap. However within 30 minutes my ankle swelled like a balloon. It took a month of rest and physio to get back in action.

(For a coach or seasoned athlete) What piece of advice would you give an aspiring athlete? You need to set a goal and be passionate about accomplishing it.

Do you have any memorable or funny story from Clonliffe Harriers that you could share? (the censorship board may review!) I go back to the celebration of the Clonliffe Harriers centenary on 1 January 1986. A cross country race was held around lunchtime on New Year’s Day. It was on the old course now Santry Demesne. It was typical cross country weather wet and cold. I was in two minds whether to run as I had a sniffle. In any event I competed and got to the finish line. Having showered all were invited to the club bar. After a short wait, which seemed like an eternity at the time, Frances Mansfield, assisted by Frankie and Nuala McDaid, opened the shutters and shouted at all and sundry that the drinks were free and courtesy of Irish Distillers. Heart-warming hot whiskies were dispensed at rapid speed. After about an hour to my consternation the shutters came down again. It was a false alarm as the shutters came up again almost immediately. Frances again at the top of her hearty voice exclaimed in clear diction – this reception is sponsored by Arthur Guinness. Wonderful glorious pints of mouthwatering Guinness started to appear. It was not long before the singing started and a great New Year’s night ensued.

What’s your favourite meal? A. For competition Bacon and mushroom pasta B. Outside competition Baked salmon and piping hot veg accompanied by a full bodied red wine.

Who is your sporting ‘hero’? (athletics or other) A. Irish Jerry Kiernan, Sonia O Sullivan, Eamon Coghlan B. International Alberto Juantorena

What’s your favourite…? A. Film It’s A Wonderful Life B. Song or Album Astral Weeks – Van Morrison C. Book James Joyce’s Ulysses

What’s your favourite holiday destination? Acoteias in the Algarve which is a sporting mecca for athletes. It’s a great location for warm weather training and the site for many Euro Cross Country Championships. Of late it’s the venue of choice for the Clonliffe Algarve Tour(Retired) under the guidance of senior coach Martin Treacy.

What’s your favourite hobby / activity outside athletics? I started practicing Chen Style Tai Chi a number of years ago. It’s the foundation for martial arts and I practice every day. I am also an active member of Toastmasters.

If you were Seb Coe what changes would you implement to improve our sport? I think there should be more of a focus in developing athletics in schools to ensure the long term survival of the sport. The IAAF should prioritise its resources to achieve this.

How would your non-athlete friends describe you? (in 3 words) Reliable, conscientious, tenacious.

What is your next running / athletics goal? (whenever normality returns!) To assist with the resumption of competitive athletic activity in the club. It would be nice to get Club Championships and some Grand Prix races, including the Clonliffe 2, underway in the near future.

How are you motivating yourself to continue training at these difficult times? I have managed to keep a good level of fitness walking each day for 1 hour and 30 minutes and practicing Tai Chi for a further 2 hours. I have particularly enjoyed the features put together by Noel Guiden on the Clonliffe web site.

Another 60 Seconds: no. 5 Stephen Cashin

A plucky young upstart ready to take the Senior circuit by storm. Has a penchant for high mileage and Cross Country. Most recent winner of the prestigious “Harrier of the year award”. (his words!)

What age did you take up the sport of athletics and why? At 10 years old I was the fastest kid in my class and I wanted to see how that translated into the real world.

When and why did you join Clonliffe Harriers? Of all clubs it was the shortest distance from my house .

What is your favourite training workout? you simply can’t beat 400’s on the track. I’ll take as many as Joe cares to give.

And your least favourite? Tempos in Santry.

What’s your favourite race / athletics meet? I have always enjoyed the uneven national XC championships. More mud than glory.

What is your most cherished or proudest moment in athletics? (as athlete and/or coach) Winning the National Junior Cross Country Championship back in November. First time I scored for the team in this race so it felt good

That great November 2019 day!

What was your worst injury – and how did you get over it? Aside from a few niggles here and there I have never been injured.

(For a coach or seasoned athlete) What piece of advice would you give an aspiring athlete? Not all progress is linear. Remain patient, and hard work will eventually pay off.

Do you have any memorable or funny story from Clonliffe Harriers that you could share? (the censorship board may review!) (Redacted…by Stephen himself! Wonder what story it was….did it involve Rum?)

What’s your favourite meal? A. For competition B. Outside competition A) Chicken Tikka Masala (extra rice) B) Cheese & Pineapple Pizza

Who is your sporting ‘hero’? (athletics or other) A. Irish B. International A) Wes Hoolahan B) Craig Engels (His devotion to the mullet is truly inspiring)

What’s your favourite…? A. Film B. Song or Album C. Book A) Interstellar B) Strange Trails – Lord Huron C) The Name of the Wind – Patrick Rothfuss

What’s your favourite holiday destination? Zurich, Switzerland

What’s your favourite hobby / activity outside athletics? I do love playing No Limit Texas hold ‘em

If you were Seb Coe what changes would you implement to improve our sport? Cathal Doyle said something a few weeks back about hyping up rivalries between athletes, and having big showdown races much like the UFC. I want that.

How would your non-athlete friends describe you? (in 3 words) awe-inspiring, magnificent, humble (very).

What is your next running / athletics goal? (whenever normality returns!) Next year the goal is to medal at either Novice XC all Ireland’s or Inter XC all Irelands. Preferably both.

How are you motivating yourself to continue training at these difficult times? Shame and fear are my primary motivators, in good times and in bad.

An even younger Stephen Cashin 2016

Another 60 seconds: no. 4 Peter Cahill

Another of Pam & Ben’s group. a returnee to the sport, who has competed since returning in club races and both Novice and Masters Cross Country.

Bio:I was brought up in Seapoint and went to the Christian Brothers in Monkstown . Living in Dublin 15 for the past sixteen years.

What age did you take up the sport of athletics and why? I took up running in primary school when I was about ten. I was quick in the swimming pool and mini tag rugby and my speed was noticed by the PE teacher.

When and why did you join Clonliffe Harriers? I took the plunge and joined Clonliffe Harriers in July 2017. This boiled down to a combination of factors. I was working on a contract at the time a few miles away and was aware of the clubs facilities and reputation. My mum’s side of the family are from Glasnevin and attended events in the Morton stadium over the years. I had run a couple of Dublin City Marathons for the bucket list and wanted to rekindle my love for running from my school days. I felt I needed a structured training environment with like minded individuals and found a great spirit, devoted coaches and a sense of community after joining the club.

What is your favourite training workout? A speed track session consisting of 300m x 3, 200m x 3 and 100m x 6 cycles run hard with a slow 100m jog recovery between repetitions. Great for testing your speed endurance and anaerobic threshold. Another favourite for some strange reason is the weekly pyramid session in Trinity fields where Ben and Pam have that natural knack on picking up on any breakdown in both running form and mechanics as you attempt that last dreaded pyramid.

And your least favourite? 800M interval repeats on the track.

What’s your favourite race / athletics meet? 1500m at the Weltklasse Zurich

What is your most cherished or proudest moment in athletics? (as athlete and/or coach) Leinster Schools Medals

What was your worst injury – and how did you get over it? Luckily touch wood I have not picked up any major running injuries except for a mild hamstring strain on two occassions and a moderate form of achilles tendonitis. (I didn’t do much running through my twenties and mid thirties which was probably a contributing factor). Followed recommended treatment protocols and extended out my recovery period to be on the safe side.

(For a coach or seasoned athlete) What piece of advice would you give an aspiring athlete? Probably not qualified enough but from my limited experience i’ll give it a shot anyway.` Train consistently and recover adequately in order to perform well. Mix up your running terrain to prevent injury and build power and speed.

Do you have any memorable or funny story from Clonliffe Harriers that you could share? (the censorship board may review!) I wondered why I was getting some funny looks on the track one balmy Thursday evening. In my eagerness to get my new skin tight lycra running shorts on I had put them on back to front. They didnt feel like the bee’s knees until I noticed my error when I arrived home.

What’s your favourite meal? A. For competition None in particular B. Outside competition Roast sea bass with mediterannean salad and roast potatoes.

Who is your sporting ‘hero’? (athletics or other) A. Eamon Coughlan, Stephen Roche, Gary O’Toole, Padraig Harrington B. International Steve Scott, Michael Phelps,

What’s your favourite…? A. Film Schindlers List B. Song or Album Aslan – This Is (Original version) C. Book Rough Ride by Paul Kimmage,

What’s your favourite holiday destination? Italy What’s your favourite hobby / activity outside athletics? Swimming, Climbing, Hiking, Socializing, Reading and Baking. Was always torn between running and swimming. I still cherish winning a Leinster Schools Swimming Championship Title.

If you were Seb Coe what changes would you implement to improve our sport? A complete overhaul of the testing systems. More stringent, random testing of athletes.

How would your non-athlete friends describe you? (in 3 words) Is Great Company

What is your next running / athletics goal? (whenever normality returns!) Race more and perform to my potential on the track both indoors and outdoors at masters level.

How are you motivating yourself to continue training at these difficult times? Luckily I am blessed with a big park on my doorstep which acts as a great motivator for maintaining some level of fitness. I get out for a run five evenings a week. Three easy runs along with a fartlek and an interval session performed on the dry grass. Great for revitalizing body and mind during these challenging times.

Peter in school’s action a little while back!
Brought to his knees!

Another 60 Seconds: no. 3 Kieran Murphy

An athlete who despite being a relative late comer to the sport set himself goals that have been well and truly met and surpassed, despite a dodgey start! Kieran Murphy.

What age did you take up the sport of athletics and why? When we moved back to Dublin in 2002, I had to have a stress ECG treadmill test as part of health screening. The doctor who did the test told me afterwards that I was only the third person he knew that had never reached maximum heart rate on the treadmill. When I casually mentioned this to a GP friend, he told me that I should try running as a sport so I started running short distances without any target or structure, mainly to maintain fitness and to keep my weight down.

When and why did you join Clonliffe Harriers? I went to a work conference in San Francisco in 2003 when I was 39 and work colleague and long-time Clonliffe Harrier Declan Murray persuaded me to run Bay to Breakers, a 12k race through the streets of San Francisco starting at the Bay and finishing at the ocean. To my surprise, I did better than some on the guys who were running with clubs so Declan insisted on bringing me to Clonliffe Harriers. The rest is history. Thanks Declan!

What is your favourite training workout? Have always liked the winter Thursday evening runs on the road even though we don’t do them so much any more. Although we are meant to be doing these as a consistent moderately paced run, the pace tends to quicken as we get closer to the club as everyone tries to get home first!

And your least favourite? I have never been good at shorter distances so least favourite workout is definitely 400 m interval repeats

What’s your favourite race / athletics meet? Definitely the marathon. You train so hard for so long and the result is dependent on so many different variables. When it works, it’s absolutely brilliant. When it doesn’t, it’s absolutely gutting.

What is your most cherished or proudest moment in athletics? (as athlete and/or coach) There are two and both relate to the marathon. I spent years trying to get a sub 3 and was always very close. In 2011, a group of us from Clonliffe did the Rotterdam Marathon and I finally got the monkey off my back when I did 2.59. Maurice McCrohan and I ran together to half-way and he turned to me and said he had never run the first half so quickly. I didn’t know whether to be alarmed or elated! As I ran down the closing stages, I remember Conor Delaney was standing beyond the finish line beckoning me towards the line and into that elite club of sub-3 marathoners. The guys knew how long I had been trying for it and it was great to be able to celebrate it with them. Jeremy Chapman didn’t have such a good day though and has vowed never to return there. We’ll get you back there some day Jeremy! The second relates to the 2018 Dublin marathon. It was a beautiful day and everything seemed to go right. I never hit the wall and crossed the line in 2.57. The icing on the cake was M55 National Silver, Leinster Gold and Dublin Gold. It was a bit like buses – for years I never got medals and then all of a sudden three showed up together!

What was your worst injury – and how did you get over it? My worst injury happened in 2017 when I tore my soleus in the run-up to DCM. I was out for about six months but with physio and the help of a good sports doc, I slowly inched my way back. Initially started walking and then very slowly running on the treadmill, increasing by just one minute each time. When I finally got to 40 minutes, I started to run outside again and gradually built up my speed. Soleus injuries can be terminal so I only really believed I had recovered after DCM the following year.

(For a coach or seasoned athlete) What piece of advice would you give an aspiring athlete? The most important thing is to listen to your body. Respect your body, don’t ask too much of it and ensure you get plenty of recovery time, especially as you get older. Most people that I started running with who are my age have now stopped running, almost all because of injury.

Do you have any memorable or funny story from Clonliffe Harriers that you could share? (the censorship board may review!) In one of my earlier years with Clonliffe, I ran a club road race (I think a 5 mile) and saw Pat Devitt in the distance with a big X on his back. I accelerated and passed him out delighted that, in my mind, I had taken his scalp. Of course, I had made my move too early and he easily passed me out on the final bend. The race was videoed and when the video was replayed afterwards, all anyone could see was Pat’s beaming grin after he had passed me by. I didn’t make that rookie mistake again!

What’s your favourite meal? A. For competition Pasta B. Outside competition I’ve been vegan for almost 10 years but I break out every Christmas and stuff myself with turkey and ham. There is nobody so carniverous as a lapsed vegan!

Who is your sporting ‘hero’? (athletics or other) A. Irish – Jerry Kiernan B. International – Abebe Bikila

What’s your favourite…? A. Film – Lord of the Rings. Love French cinema so maybe Jean de Florette / Manon des Sources too. B. Song or Album – Hard to pick just one. Like all types of music especially classical and jazz C. Book The China Study (for all you aspiring vegans out there!)

What’s your favourite holiday destination? Mallorca

What’s your favourite hobby / activity outside athletics? I play the piano

If you were Seb Coe what changes would you implement to improve our sport? Root out drug use – biggest threat to athletics

How would your non-athlete friends describe you? (in 3 words) If I find any I’ll ask them

What is your next running / athletics goal? (whenever normality returns!) I would like to get back into a regular training structure as soon as possible. Would like to look at the European Masters circuit.

How are you motivating yourself to continue training at these difficult times? It’s a bit harder to get motivated without the structure of weekly training and a race or two to aim for. However, running is so much a part of my daily routine that it’s not really a problem. Philip O’Doherty has started up a 5k virtual race so that will help too. I love when I get out for my daily run – it just clears the head and makes eating and drinking much more guilt-free!

Kieran takes it out on those “Country Roads”
National Masters XC, Santry, 2007

Another 60 Seconds: No. 2 Stephen Bateson

We really need to keep this going. Today a great insight into a guy who has thrown himself 100% into the “way of the true Harrier”: sitting on the club committee, coaching, course building. Basically a brilliant “whatever is needed” Clonliffe Harrier.

Bio: 49 year old Structural Engineer with Irish Rail, Assistant Coach to Joe Cooper with Junior Men and Assistant Club Secretary. 12 Marathons under my belt and plenty of miles in road races. Love putting up the Cross Country Courses in Santry, don’t always enjoy taking them back down!

What age did you take up the sport of athletics and why? I ran quite a lot when I was young and was reasonably good, winning in school and local sports days. I represented my schools at both primary and secondary level and even made the National’s in Belfield one year and finished 9th in the North Leinsters. Then I fancied myself as a footballer and played Gaelic Football till my mid 30’s mostly with Ballymun Kickhams and finished playing with Dunderry in Co. Meath before my 3rd child was born. I won a couple of Championship medals and was player of the year a couple of times with Kickhams so I favoured the football. On reflection I really was only good at running around a pitch and was relatively fast so I probably should have pursued the athletics. After the football, I toyed with the idea of going back to running for a couple of years and then started back with Dunshaughlin AC with a bit of gentle persuasion from Paddy Mangan. My first race was the Dunshaughlin 10K on mid-summer night in sweltering heat after 2 weeks training, it was a real baptism of fire but I enjoyed it enough to keep going.

When and why did you join Clonliffe Harriers? This is my second stint in Clonliffe Harriers, I was a member when I was 12 -14 yrs old, got the club gear in the shop behind the Cat and Gage and remember the long runs out by the airport. When we moved back to Dublin 2016, my Daughter Sarah switched to Clonliffe and then I followed and joined Philip O’Doherty’s group. I ran a couple of Marathons in both Dunshaughlin and Clonliffe vests. Joe gave me a shout to ask if I would give a hand with the Juniors and I haven’t looked back. Noel asked me then to help out as assistant secretary which I was very happy to be involved in, it opens up a whole new area in Athletics which can be rewarding.

What is your favourite training workout? When I am fit I love a good long Sunday run but I was never good at getting up at 6.00 in the morning to do these. The longer the day goes on, the more difficult it is to get these done.

And your least favourite? Nowadays it is anything repetitive on the track or running with my daughter Sarah when she takes off and I can’t catch her!

What’s your favourite race / athletics meet? The Dunshaughlin 10 k is probably my favourite race as it always high quality and is well supported. There is an atmosphere around the race which is not matched anywhere else. That said even my best time there I was beaten by a guy wearing a beer bottle costume. The Dublin Marathon, of course, can be a great day but I have shuffled home from most of them. They are great when you think back on them though. We have attended the Morton Games for a good few years, I love the Morton Mile and it has been great to be involved as a volunteer for the last couple of years.

What is your most cherished or proudest moment in athletics? (as athlete and/or coach) The last couple of years as assistant coach have been very fruitful for the club at Junior level with a number of individual and team medals in the cross country and a number of individual titles on the track in both schools and club. The athletes have done all the hard work under the guidance of Joe and personally I have learned an awful lot about the sport during this time. There have been races where someone may not have performed to their best but as a team and group they have always been there for each other. This is something I cherish with working with this group and something in the long run that the club should benefit from. As an individual stand-out moment Jayme Rossiter hurdling the water jump to win the 2019 Senior National Steeple chase was very memorable.

What was your worst injury – and how did you get over it? I was involved in a car crash in 2013 and following that I have had a number of problems with my back and hips mainly due to tighten muscles in my back. I was never the most flexible with regards to stretching but that accident has resulted in me being more limited. Like most athletes I still don’t always stretch prior to running and should not be surprised that I end up crooked.

(For a coach or seasoned athlete) What piece of advice would you give an aspiring athlete? The most obvious thing to me (now) and I hear Joe saying it often, that Athletes should listen to their own bodies. Many times over the years, both playing football and running, I didn’t and ended up with injuries. As a coach you can’t know what or how the Athlete feels, so it’s up to them to let the coach know.

Do you have any memorable or funny story from Clonliffe Harriers that you could share? (the censorship board may review!) When Joe Cooper took me off whistle duties! One evening in the Trinity Grounds when doing a session on the whistle Joe asked me to keep the time and blow the whistle to start/stop the efforts. It was a windy day but to be fair more breezy than windy. I was working away but then heard Joe calling me to blow the whistle louder, so I put a bit more effort into it. However the next time the lads came around Ben Guiden gave me a message to whistle louder. At this stage I was blowing from my socks up. Next thing, still not happy, Joe comes over and yells “give me the ******* whistle”. He noted that I was the only person he ever stood down from whistle duties. I have only recently been re-instated!

What’s your favourite meal? A. For competition: Porridge it the morning and pasta the night before, fairly predictable. B. Outside competition: Steak, Chips and pepper sauce with a glass of red wine.

Who is your sporting ‘hero’? (athletics or other) A. Irish, John McCarthy, Dublin footballer. My mother always loved “the Dubs” and we watched as kids in the 1970’s. In my first senior Match for Ballymun Kickhams, my first touch of the balls was to catch and pass to the on-running “Macker” who took the pass and slotted it over the bar. B. International, Calumn Hawkins, hugely impressive Marathon runner you can believe in!

What’s your favourite…? A. Film – I like a black and white Ealing movie with Alec Guiness or Jack Hawkins. B. Song or Album – Johnny Cash, The American Recordings. C. Book – Watership Down, John Adams, but I can read anything. I not much interested in Sports biography as a genre, but Charlie Speddings “From last to First” was interesting. I like books around factual World War II spies and Bletchley Park.

What’s your favourite holiday destination? St Raphael in Southern France.

What’s your favourite hobby / activity outside athletics? A few pints and a chat with my Dad.

If you were Seb Coe what changes would you implement to improve our sport? Investing into athletics where most clubs and associations internationally are run by volunteers. I would like to see the sport regaining its high interest from spectators, promote profiles of high performance athletes to draw in crowds into stadiums again and get kids to see athletics as a sport to engage in rather than just GAA, Soccer, Rugby etc. Athletics meets need to bring entertainment to draw investors, sponsorship and crowds.

How would your non-athlete friends describe you? (in 3 words) Funny, Obliging, Reliable.

What is your next running / athletics goal? (whenever normality returns!) I would like to get back fit and attempt a marathon without falling over the finish line and ending up in the medical tent. I might even do the Dublin Masters Cross Country (if Joe selects me!).

How are you motivating yourself to continue training at these difficult times? The lock down allowed me to run more than I have for a long time. At the beginning I was very unfit and by doing 5k per day initially for a month or so I have been able to build this up to 60 Km a week. I feel that I am lucky to have running to keep busy and the mind occupied. It’s been good to have and I haven’t suffered from lack of motivation.

Season 2, Another 60 Seconds: Aaron Cullen

Just like Netflicks as Season 1 finishes Season 2 starts. So here we go again with the imaginatively titled “Another 60 seconds”! We’d like this Season 2 to have more than a limited run, however, unless you the members want to get involved that’s exactly what it’s going to be. So far we’ve 4 Harriers who are up for it, so the duration of this season is a matter that’s entirely up to you. If you want it it’s here. (club members who would like to be involved e mail clonliffeharriersac@gmail.com). First up in Season 2, it’s one of our top Juniors….

Bio: Aaron Cullen, 18 years old, 6th year student in Portmarnock CS. Middle distance athlete (primarily 1500m).

What age did you take up the sport of athletics and why? Probably around 8 (I can’t quite remember) – I wasn’t the best at team sports, I couldn’t understand how I could have the best match of my life and still lose or have the worst match of my life and come out with the win – with running I could see where the results came from.

When and why did you join Clonliffe Harriers? Around 5th class (I think). I started running in Fingallians AC. Why? Not many clubs have a wall dedicated to Olympians!

What is your favourite training workout? Joe’s Tuesday pre race workout – 500/400/300/200/100 off 2 minutes recovery.

And your least favourite? Mile repeats around Santry Park – Ben normally bruises the ego of the entire group!

What’s your favourite race / athletics meet? All Ireland Schools track – nothing seems bigger than schoolboy rivals

What is your most cherished or proudest moment in athletics? (as athlete and/or coach) I couldn’t decide between these two. All Ireland Schools track 2017 – I took the gold in the mile, Daniel won the inter steeple and Craig brought 2 silver medals back to Portmarnock. Everything went right on the day! All Ireland junior cross this year. For the first time in 4 or 5 years the clonliffe junior team were serious underdogs going into the race. On the day everything fell into place and we won.

What was your worst injury – and how did you get over it? I had a stress fracture during the 2018 cross country season. At the time it wasn’t ideal but looking back on it, it wasn’t the worst injury to get. I’ve had teammates with reoccurring or undiagnosed injuries, at least with a stress fracture you’ll be out of the boot in 6 weeks and back running in 7 or 8 weeks.

(For a coach or seasoned athlete) What piece of advice would you give an aspiring athlete? Don’t forget to run slow during the week, we get preoccupied by what our watches say at times, there is no shame in running at 7.30 or slower.

Do you have any memorable or funny story from Clonliffe Harriers that you could share? (the censorship board may review!) I’ve ran with Daniel for too many years now but there has to be some code of ethics within the group.

What’s your favourite meal? A. For competition: plain pasta with chicken, sausage and bacon. B. Outside competition: Anything with BQQ sauce

Who is your sporting ‘hero’? (athletics or other) A. Irish: Eamonn Coghlan B. International: Centro

What’s your favourite…? A. Film: The Big Short or Good Will Hunting B. Song or Album: Anything that makes a 5k radius feel like the phoenix park C. Book: Elon Musks’ biography

What’s your favourite holiday destination? I really loved Washington DC

What’s your favourite hobby / activity outside athletics? I love coffee shops and eating Indian food (a staple of my diet)

If you were Seb Coe what changes would you implement to improve our sport? How many times have you watched a Diamond league race where 80% of the athletes are sporting the same Nike Kit and the rest are kitted out in Adidas gear? It must be mad for an outsider to turn on the TV and see all the athletes wearing the same shoes, singlet and shorts. I would implement a policy where the shoe companies have to set up teams just as OTC, Bowerman TC or the Boston Reebok TC and design different gear for each team. Perhaps even start a league between the teams or implement a draft like in the NBA, NFL etc.

How would your non-athlete friends describe you? (in 3 words) Shameless generic answer – “the running one”.

What is your next running / athletics goal? (whenever normality returns!) 3.50 in the 1500 How are you motivating yourself to continue training at these difficult times? It’s a great opportunity to build up a good base before cross country and focus on the 1%ers such as s&c.

Aaron IAAF XC, Seville Jan. 2020

Young Guns: (R to L) Aaron, Cian Bolger, Ben Guiden club juvenile XC , 2014
2019 National Junior XC Champions, Abbotstown Nov.

The Last Word! No.60 of 60 Seconds… with Joe

So today it’s an absolute pleasure to present No. 60 in the 60 Seconds series, the season finale (although Season 2 is already in production!) and to give the Last Word to the Clonliffe Harriers Club Captain Joe Cooper.

Bio: Joe Cooper club Captain Clonliffe Harriers former member of: Home Farm FC , Avona BC, Larkhill United FC and Civil Services AC At 15 I was playing football (soccer) for Home Farm those days it was an 11 man team with no subs and the football was held together with a lace, the pitches were often wet and heavy under foot which made for some long tough matches, At the time the coaches from Home Farm who were very good to me came to me and said I needed to build up my endurance to last the distance of the game, so in addition to my football & boxing training I took up running,

What age did you take up the sport of athletics and why? I had always been into my exercise and anyone who knows me will know I enjoy a “few sociables” but I was looking for more of a structure and commitment to my sport so when I was 28 I took a job with An post on the Dublin to Cork mail train (many a story I could tell!!!) at this point I was running in a few local road races then I join the An Post athletics team which eventually led me to join Civil Services AC and my running career really began and many a lifelong friendship was made

When and why did you join Clonliffe Harriers? All of my children were in the local athletics club Green Field AC run by local man Des Holmes based in Albert College Park, when Green field amalgamated with Clonliffe Harriers Gladys my wife took over as Juvenile Captain and I came on board a few years later helping her out with coaching, I did a short stint as ladies captain and eventually progressing to Club Captain & Coach

What is your favourite training workout? As an athlete training for a Marathon I really enjoyed the track endurance session of 20 x 400m or 1 km reps As a coach I now see the importance of getting a mixture of session’s covering track, road and cross-country to build both speed and endurance.

And your least favourite? Least favourite for me has to be the long runs anything over 15 miles was tough both physically and mentally

What’s your favourite race / athletics meet? Any meeting / race form Belfast to Bagdad and I’m happy…..I’ve been extremely lucky to have been to European and World Championship track and cross-country as well as Olympic Games But the home grown ones are the best and the Morton Games is one that I particularly enjoy but there is lot of work that goes into organising, so you can sometimes miss out of getting the full spectator experience, Plus the after party is always great craic

What is your most cherished or proudest moment in athletics? (as athlete and/or coach) As an athlete I have 2 stand out moments the first was winning the Master Raheny 5mile in at time of 24.50 only to be broken the following year by Richard Mulligan in 24.39 and second would by finishing the Guinness now Dublin Half Marathon in a time of 68.38 As club captain / coach there have been several achievements that stand out most noticeably would be in 2015 on home turf in Santry where we won the National Senior Men’s XC Championship the National Jnr Men’s XC championship and Hope Saunders winning the Nat Jnr ladies XC Championship This was closely followed the clubs 1st win in the National Track & Field League Championship which ultimately lead to a Bronze medal in the European Clubs Track & Field Championship in Portugal. Most recently seeing Efrem Gidey take the bronze medal at the U-20 European XC championships in Lisbon which unfortunately due to ill health I was unable to attend

What was your worst injury – and how did you get over it? Plantar Fasciitis Rest, Rest and more Rest….listen to your body

(For a coach or seasoned athlete) What piece of advice would you give an aspiring athlete? Enjoy your sport.Be consistent in your training. Rest is equally important as training. “You are better off looking at it rather than looking for it (gear)” For Junior athletes the grass is not always greener somewhere else, on balance I would advise junior athletes to stay at home. I know in the past the American scholarship system produced great athletes such as O’Sullivan, Coughlan, O’Mara and Treacy but nearer to home less than 100miles away in the UK they produced Coe, Ovett, Elliott, Cram, Bedford, Morecroft, Hill, Muir and Hawkin????

Do you have any memorable or funny story from Clonliffe Harriers that you could share? (the censorship board may review!) Many moons ago a good Civil Service AC teammate of mine Mick Fennell aka Snapper had his stags do up in the Clonliffe Bar. In our drunken wisdom, we decided to have a naked 800m race. Being the professional in the group I was appointed the role as starter (naked) Just as I are about to start this prestigious event a woman form the bar comes down to the track she took one look at us and said “You’re like a Tinkers Greyhounds all Ribs and P***k with no B***S……Clearly a few shandys was had that night!!!!

What’s your favourite meal? A. For competition A good Spaghetti Bolognese with brown pasta for carb loading and plenty of water B. Outside competition From Independent Pizza, The House special with side salad & wedges

Who is your sporting ‘hero’? (athletics or other) A. Irish: Alistair Cragg, who won a gold medal in the 3000m at the European Indoor Championship (2005) and finished an impressive 4th in the World Indoor Championships (2006) and is currently the National Irish record holder for both the 5km and 10k (Track). Outside of athletics I would consider Paul McGrath to be another Irish sporting hero of mine B. International Ron Clark (long before many of you would know) “Smokin” Joe Frazier

What’s your favourite…? A. Film :Tinker Tailor Solider Spy ,Witches of Eastwik, Clock Work Orange B. Song or Album: Brian Ferry “Stick Together”, The Kinks / Luke Kelly “Thank you for the Days , Them “Its all over now baby blue” C. Book: Occasions of Sin, Roses are Red

What’s your favourite holiday destination? Cuba or anywhere there is a race meet on!!!

What’s your favourite hobby / activity outside athletics? More athletics!!!

If you were Seb Coe what changes would you implement to improve our sport? That there should be 10% added to prize money for club/coaches who have nurtured these athletes form an early age. This additional funding would be used for reinvestment into producing future athletes starting at local cub level

How would your non-athlete friends describe you? (in 3 words) Chancer Fun But serious when it comes down to training

What is your next running / athletics goal? (whenever normality returns!) To get back to full health and be back up at club with a stopwatch in hand and ready to go

How are you motivating yourself to continue training at these difficult times? All ways remember that just because the water is clam does not mean there are no Sharks about!

Joe (2266) sits on the shoulder of future clubmate and goat Tony Murphy
Joe playing in a puddle at cross country race!
Impressive Dublin Marathon
Joe makes it 5 national seniors in a row , Belfast 2008

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